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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
government can help. >> part of the reason we will be able to respond quickly to all of this is that they help that fema financing was in place. leaving aside campaign jabs for post-crisis unit. >> you see neighbors helping neighbors and you are reminded what america is all about. >> on the downside, if power isn't restored to hundreds of thousands of americans they could vent their frustrations at the ballot box. >> consider the politics of all of this. super storm sandy has two battleground states new hampshire and virginia. the way this could hurt president is by des pressing the early vote. neither new hampshire origingin has in person early votes. it comes down to election day turn out. let's look at the states it did devastate. new jersey, new york, connecticut those are blue states where the president is already positioned to win. anderson? >> the president begins campaigning again tomorrow is that correct? >> yes, he is on the road tomorrow. >> go ahead. he is in colorado, nevada, and colorado, nevada and one other battleground state and then he heads to ohio.
of the government in terms of their resources, is at our beckoning and certainly once we have had an opportunity to do a full assessment with respect to our needs, we will be calling the federal government and asking for those resources. >> had you quite a dustup with the governor of your state, chris christie, who basically accused you of ignoring state-issued evacuation orders, telling people they could shelter in place as a last resort. what do you make of that? earlier, you said governor christie should call you and be man enough to own up to what you said is the mischaracterizations of what you advised residents. have you heard anything from him? >> i have not. i expect some point tomorrow our paths will cross. listen, what's important is to make sure all of us, the governor, the mayor and every elected official makes sure that we keep what's really important first and foremost and that's the safety of the constituents that we serve. anything personal between the governor and i, i look beyond that, i'm more magnanimous about that. i'm not about personalities, i'm about principle. we have a
forward here. i'm going to need a lot of help from the federal government, the state government, the local government, the individuals in our community, professionals that certainly know a lot more than myself. because we're going to be going basically from the ground up. seaside heights as it wass was before it never be known that way again. >> i understand there were rescue efforts under way earlier today. can you give us the latest on that? >> yes, most of the rescues, we've gotten out, just about everybody that we can at this point in time. we feel like that we've gotten everybody that's wanted to go out. some people waited until a very, very late date, and we got some very special people over here that have a wonderful job, volunteers that want to do nothing more than just help put their own life on the line to just help these people. and we're very grateful to have individuals like that. our rescue is just about i would say about 98% complete. >> mayor, my thoughts and prayer, as are the thoughts of prayers of so many with you and your community right now. i wish you the best. we'll
back because some government offices were closed during the storm. the only other time in history the jobs report was delay was in 1996 because of the federal government shutdown. a reminder, this is the last jobs report before election day and the government tells us they're working real hard to make sure that jobs report is ready as scheduled. soledad? >> all right, christine, thank you for that update. >>> still ahead this morning, i want to show you a picture of a crane we were watching closely yesterday. this morning, that crane has toppled quite a bit. take a look. the top of the crane has tipped from being tilted toward the building to tipped away from the building. it has started to collapse. they can't secure it any more because of the high winds. this is at a luxury high-rise called 157. we're back in just a moment. i'm only in my 60's... i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i got a medicare supplement insurance plan. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare, you may know it only covers ab
a way to say yes. >> reporter: demonstrating a well-funded federal government can help. >> part of the reason we will be able to respond quickly to all of this is because they helped to make sure that fema financing was in place. >> reporter: and leaving aside campaign jabs for post-crisis unity. >> you see neighbors helping neighbors and you are reminded what america is all about. >> on the down side, if power isn't restored for hundreds of thousands of americans, they could vent their frustration at the ballot box. and no one knows how the storm will impact turnout on election day. in the state hit by sandy or in the rest of the country watching this tragedy unfold. political observers initially said the storm could hurt president obama by depressing the early vote in battleground states. but the battleground states hit by the storm, new hampshire and virginia, don't have in-person early voting. so not really a concern for the obama campaign. as for depressing turnout on election day, well, the storm could affect that. but the states hardest hit by the storm are blue states, n
that it takes you yelling to start to get some answers. >> you're not supposed to govern by yelling. but frustration went into anger. but it seem to have gotten some results. >> what do you need most right now in staten island? >> i need fema to be. there i got a call from fema headquarters that they'll have a squad there tomorrow attached to me. >> so they'll be there tomorrow. >> absolutely, he said. and then we'll go toward staten island. people need someone to speak to. how do i get help? from whom do i get help? how do my children go to school? they have no clothes, this he have no home. these are questions that should be answered by government. to do for people what people can't do for themselves. there are no answers. >> we want to touch base with your mom and if that team doesn't show up, will you let us know? >> absolutely. i want to thank you to give us the publicity that we need. thank you very, very much. god bless you. god bless you. >> thank you very much. let us know what you think. follow us on twitter @anderson cooper. i'll be tweeting downtown where i live and lowe
responsibility from the federal government. his campaign explicitly said on monday, he wouldn't abolish fema. fema takes care of a lot of disasters well below the level of hurricane sandy, including local floods, what have you. if fema could focus on big-ticket events like this one, it's possible it would be able to do its job better and state responsibility for lower level minor disasters that could be handled exclusively by states, that's a legitimate question. mitt romney wouldn't want to abolish fema, and he made that explicitly clear. >> a model interesting for health care. let me ask you this, and i want john to weigh in as well. a lot of key states have been hit by this storm, and also states that aren't hit, early voting going on, and the news cycle has changed somewhat. so when you look at who this may help, the storm, in terms of early voting what is your verdict? >> well, you look at a state like virginia, where several key jurisdictions today announced they would be extending hours for early absentee voting, that's a good thing. there are many who won't have the chance as a resul
with government at large. so the sense of being disenfranchised, not as engaged, and that's been, you know, a bit disheartening but i think it's on us to ask questions, to make sure that our friends get involved, and i have seen as we've gotten closer to election day a lot of young people are starting to talk about it more, so i mean, that's been encouraging. >> kristen, in 2008, president obama won 66% of the under 30 vote, 34% margin of victory over john mccain. you say the president's numbers are high this time around but certainly not as high as 2008. >> not at all. you had a recent poll come out that harvard released where he had a 19 point advantage. it's still a wide margin but not nearly the margin that he had four years ago. if he doesn't hold young voters to a significant margin that's close to those '08 numbers, it's going to be really tough for him to put together his majority coalition to try to win this election. >> peter, you spoke with obama campaign officials today about the youth turnout they expect this cycle. what did they tell you? >> well, they point out that there's sort of
. >> reporter: demonstrating a well-funded federal government can help. >> part of the reason we can respond quickly to all of this, they helped make sure fema financing was in place. >> and leaving aside campaign jabs for post crisis unity. >> you see neighbored helping neighbors. then are you reminded about what america is all about. >> reporter: on the down side? if power isn't restored for hundreds of thousands of americans, they could vent their frustration at the ballot box and no one knows how the storm will impact turnout on election day, by a state hit by sandy. >> political observers initially said the storm could hurt president obama by depressing the early vote in battle ground states. the battleground states, nam, and virginia, don't worry about early person voting, not really a determine for the obama campaign. the storm could affect early voter turnout. but the states hardest hit are blue states, new jersey, new york, and connecticut. they are still likely to go for president obama. cnn, jessica yellin, the white house. >> here with the hoboken mayor, dawn zimmer what a day a
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)